One of the ideals of the initiative on sexual health and rights initiative (ISHRAI) is to advocate for an enabling environment at the community, state and national levels that ensures the functionality of all persons irrespective of age, linguistic or religious affiliation, ethnic origin, functional disability, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, marital status or any other circumstance affecting the private person.

Improved Sexual Health and Rights Advocacy Initiative (ISHRAI) was founded in, 2014 and formally registered with Corporate Affairs Commission on the 13th day of January, 2017.

ISHRAI, is a sexual health and rights initiative focused on promoting, the health and rights of marginalized groups in Nigeria through advocacy, active participation, service delivery and innovative engagement processes.

Among other things, one of the ideals of the initiative on sexual health and rights initiative is to advocate for an enabling environment at the community, state and national levels that ensures the functionality of all persons irrespective of age, linguistic or religious affiliation, ethnic origin, functional disability, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, marital status or any other circumstance affecting the private person.

We are one of the fastest growing non-profit, non-governmental, community based organization headquartered in Lagos State, Nigeria.

Sexual Minority Persons are forced to deal with the effects of many discriminatory legislation which very many often seeks to criminalize their behavior. These laws and resulting fear of discrimination, violence, and arrests further prevent them from accessing health and Human Rights services.

Not only are these Person suffering from various forms of health challenges such as but not limited to HIV/AIDS, STIs,  they also suffers from varying degrees of Human Rights abuses and simultaneously difficult to reach with appropriate interventions.

This is because key populations are often mobile, stigmatized, unable to self-identify, marginalized, and at a higher risk of physical abuse.

Due to these factors, it is difficult for most organizations to reach these sexual minority groups and key populations with accurate, non-judgmental educational materials that are rights-based and gender sensitive. Specialized and carefully adapted intervention techniques are required.

Additionally, the lack of sexual minority or KP-friendly and competent care in public and private health facilities and other service delivery points further increases the vulnerability of key populations by discouraging them from accessing services.